completelydevoidofsubstance:

it’s not that big of a deal, or at least not any more
 - 
a. 

completelydevoidofsubstance:

it’s not that big of a deal, or at least not any more

 - 

a. 

Why you should be flattered when you get a harsh review/critique

gem-by-night:

Especially with amateur writers like yourself.

I draw this from personal experience both reviewing and being reviewed. Reviewers feel threatened when confronted with decent, competent, or even really good work. When someone asks you to give your opinion on their writing, and you go into their story intending to have a lot to say, and suddenly find yourself really enjoying the read or at a lack of things to critique—you become extra-determined to find something.

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I don't hate you, I really enjoy your blog

thanks, babe. :)

I might change my theme to something a little more simple. This one drains me, and it’s getting quite old.

I know NaNo is not for a while, but I’m starting to think up some of my plots. Names come to me easily, characters as well, but as for all the little details—they take forever!

Sometimes I avoid coming on tumblr because I have this crippling anxiety that everyone hates me and would rather do without.

I'm not sure if you consider fanfiction to be writing, but do you have any tips?
Anonymous

thewritingcafe:

It’s similar to writing anything else, except you already have the characters, the world, and some plot points already in place.

The Characters: Don’t take the name of canon characters and make them completely different people. The people who read fan fiction most likely want to read the characters they love, so you have to write these characters well and you have to know them well.

The World: Don’t break any of the rules set in this world, especially if the genre is fantasy or sci-fi or any of its sub genres. If you’re writing it in a different time period, research that time period just as you would if you were writing original historical fiction. You have to know the world well to write it accurately.

Original Characters: Original fan fiction characters tend to be Mary Sues or Gary Stus or they’re super special snowflakes. This is a huge turnoff in readers and hurts experience with character creation and development.

Edit: Edit your work. Get a beta reader. Make it as best as you possibly can before posting online because well written work = more fans. If you have countless spelling and grammar errors or errors with characterization, world building, plot, etc., it’ll turn off the reader and they may not come back for more.

Important: It’s generally a bad idea to change names and small details of your fan fiction to pass it off as original fiction for publication. Many consider it plagiarism and lazy writing because it far surpasses being inspired by a piece of work.

More:

The hard part about writing a novel is finishing it.
Ernest Hemingway
With writing, we have second chances.
 Jonathan Safran FoerEverything is Illuminated

writewild:

"Start telling the stories that only you can tell, because there’ll always be better writers than you and there’ll always be smarter writers than you. There will always be people who are much better at doing this or doing that - but you are the only you.

Tarantino - you can criticize everything that Quentin does - but nobody writes Tarantino stuff like Tarantino. He is the best Tarantino writer there is, and that was actually the thing that people responded to - they’re going ‘this is an individual writing with his own point of view’.

There are better writers than me out there, there are smarter writers, there are people who can plot better - there are all those kinds of things, but there’s nobody who can write a Neil Gaiman story like I can.”

- Neil Gaiman

fuckyeahwritelife:

You are your very first audience. Write what you want to read.

It’s important to remember that characters are not people. OK? People are those beings you see walking around all day. Some of them are interesting, some of them are boring. Some of them are goofy and some of them are serious, and that’s all well and good. Characters, though, ALWAYS have to be interesting.

Writing Advice #28: Building Character(s) Pt. 2 — Barry Lyga Dot Com

Be sure to read this one to discover one of my favorite characters in all of popular culture…and why!

zeldareed:

Neil Gaiman’s Advice To Aspiring Writers
"If you’re only going to write when you’re inspired, you may be a fairly decent poet, but you will never be a novelist — because you’re going to have to make your word count today, and those words aren’t going to wait for you, whether you’re inspired or not. So you have to write when you’re not “inspired.” … And the weird thing is that six months later, or a year later, you’re going to look back and you’re not going to remember which scenes you wrote when you were inspired and which scenes you wrote because they had to be written."
“The process of writing can be magical — there times when you step out of an upper-floor window and you just walk across thin air, and it’s absolute and utter happiness. Mostly, it’s a process of putting one word after another.”
“You have to finish things — that’s what you learn from, you learn by finishing things.”
“If you like fantasy and you want to be the next Tolkien, don’t read big Tolkienesque fantasies — Tolkien didn’t read big Tolkienesque fantasies, he read books on Finnish philology. Go and read outside of your comfort zone, go and learn stuff.”
“Tell your story. Don’t try and tell the stories that other people can tell. Because [as a] starting writer, you always start out with other people’s voices — you’ve been reading other people for years… But, as quickly as you can, start telling the stories that only you can tell — because there will always be better writers than you, there will always be smarter writers than you … but you are the only you.”

zeldareed:

Neil Gaiman’s Advice To Aspiring Writers

  • "If you’re only going to write when you’re inspired, you may be a fairly decent poet, but you will never be a novelist — because you’re going to have to make your word count today, and those words aren’t going to wait for you, whether you’re inspired or not. So you have to write when you’re not “inspired.” … And the weird thing is that six months later, or a year later, you’re going to look back and you’re not going to remember which scenes you wrote when you were inspired and which scenes you wrote because they had to be written."
  • The process of writing can be magical — there times when you step out of an upper-floor window and you just walk across thin air, and it’s absolute and utter happiness. Mostly, it’s a process of putting one word after another.”
  • You have to finish things — that’s what you learn from, you learn by finishing things.”
  • If you like fantasy and you want to be the next Tolkien, don’t read big Tolkienesque fantasies — Tolkien didn’t read big Tolkienesque fantasies, he read books on Finnish philology. Go and read outside of your comfort zone, go and learn stuff.”
  • Tell your story. Don’t try and tell the stories that other people can tell. Because [as a] starting writer, you always start out with other people’s voices — you’ve been reading other people for years… But, as quickly as you can, start telling the stories that only you can tell — because there will always be better writers than you, there will always be smarter writers than you … but you are the only you.”
me every time i write something: i have no idea where this came from..